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“we find a grimmer reality”

 


(SOUNDBITE OF BUCKETS AND WATER)

(SOUNDBITE OF POUNDING)

(SOUNDBITE OF WATER FLOWING INTO A BUCKET)

(SOUNDBITE OF CLANGING DOOR)

(SOUNDBITE OF WATER SPLASHING)

(SOUNDBITE OF GOATS)

(SOUNDBITE OF DIGGING)

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: And our NPR crew documented Haiti’s water trouble at a time of cholera in sound and pictures. You can see their slideshow at npr.org. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

 


How many are dead? 7,000.
That’s a lot. Isn’t that a lot?

Define slum.

I heard cholera was easily treated. I am afraid of cholera.

What? The epidemic was caused by leaky latrines being used by UN Peacekeepers? That shall not be true.

Oh, okay, phew. There are people down there with degrees from U.S. institutions; they are trying to help. Oh, okay, phew.

Reporter: “Is it heavy?”
NO, it’s not heavy! Just 63 pounds of water in a bucket, and I carry it on my head for thirty minutes.

SHUT UP, NPR!

No, you shut up. He’s good people. They all are. Good, good people.
You listen. You listen. You listen.

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I had never heard the term “foley artist” until right now, so thanks. It is rather seditious to criticize NPR, isn’t it? It’s one of those barnacled bureaucracies with a good heart. Kind of like the UN.

Humor me, please, I’ve not read anyone who is repelled by NPR. You are not alone in your hatred of NPR for the foley artists. I have a special hatred of them for this and a multitude of their listener-gouging shitty sins. My especial object of spite is the use of “translators” who emphasize the presumed accent and gender of the speaker, ala Speedy Gonzales reporting from the war on drugs in Mexico. I no longer listen, and bristle when I am subjected to them by others. Free yourself, join me in getting your news elsewhere.

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